Tag Archives: food

Evening Primrose

Evening Primrose

General Information

Scientific Name: Onagraceae Onagroideae Onagreae Oenethera sp.
Common Names:  Evening Primrose, sundrops, sun cups
Zones 4-9
perennial, biennial reseeder (depending on species)
Growth Habit: Central stalks with radiating branches.
Height: 1-10 feet (10 feet!) depending on species
Permaculture Designation: herbaceous layer, medicinal, flowering beneficial, food

 Comments

The most common warning, in fact it’s near the top on most of the pages I’ve read, is that evening primrose is hard to control once established.  One poster labelled it a “garden thug” as it takes over where it’s planted.  The other common refrain is that evening primrose “thrives on neglect.”  Fairly drought tolerant and needs light to sandy soil that drains well.  Easy to grow, self-propagates, with medicinal and food uses, pretty flowers and insect attractors.  Sounds like a great permaculture plant.

There are many, many species of Oenethera, so some additional research may be needed on each species as to edibility, invasiveness, etc…  Most of the sources I’ve seen claim the entire plant is edible – the leaves as greens, the flowers as garnishes, and the roots as root vegetables. The medicinal property comes from the oil of the seeds.  Pressing your own seeds can be challenging, as the seeds are quite small, and you will need a great volume of seeds to make the effort worth it.  The seeds can be prepared culinarily (used similar to poppy seeds) and the medicinal quality made available by lightly grinding the seeds to prevent them from simply passing through the digestive system whole.

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Marshmallow

Marsh Mallow

General Information

Scientific Name: Malvaceae Althaea officinalis
Common Names:  Marshmallow, Althaea, Mortification Root, Althaea and Cheeses
Zones 3-
perennial
Growth Habit: Central Stalk with a few branches
Height: 4-5 feet
Permaculture Designation: Medicinal, Food, Flowering Beneficial

 Comments

Marshmallow is a tall herb with a central stalk, and works well as a northern edge backdrop.  Does not require marshy conditions as the name suggests, but does need to be well watered.  As a perennial, the stalk dies back in the Fall and winter, and comes up from the roots the following season.  The flowers appear late in the summer and into the fall, and give way to small round fruits that are commonly called “cheese” for their similarity to small bricks of cheese.

What I’ve got growing in the front has been kind of slow, perhaps because it was started in late spring and transplanted.

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